Two Door Cinema Club

Two Door Cinema Club are an indie rock band from Bangor and Donaghadee in County DownNorthern Ireland. The band formed in 2007 and is composed of three members: Alex Trimble (vocals, rhythm guitar, beats, synths), Sam Halliday (lead guitar, backing vocals), and Kevin Baird (bass, synths, backing vocals).

The band's debut album, Tourist History, was released on 1 March 2010 by French independent record label Kitsuné Music. In the United States, where the band are signed to Glassnote Records, the album was released on 27 April 2010. Tourist History was selected for the Choice Music Prize for Irish Album of the Year (2010) the following year.

Manic Street Preachers

Dressed in glam clothing, wearing heavy eyeliner, and shouting political rhetoric, the Manic Street Preachers emerged in 1991 from their hometown of Blackwood, Wales, as self-styled "Generation Terrorists." Fashioning themselves after the Clash and the Sex Pistols, the Manics were on a mission, intending to restore revolution to rock & roll at a time when Britain was dominated by trancey shoegazers and faceless, trippy acid house. Their self-consciously dangerous image, leftist leanings, crunching hard rock, and outsider status made them favorites of the British music press and helped them build a rabidly dedicated following.

For much of the band's early career, it was impossible to separate the rhetoric from the music and even from the members themselves -- the group's image was forever associated with lyricist/guitarist Richey James carving the words "4 Real" into his arm during an early interview. As the British pop music climate shifted toward Brit-pop in the wake of Suede, the Manics didn't achieve fame, but they did attain notoriety. Legions of followers emerged, including many bands that formed the core of the short-lived "new wave of new wave" movement.

But as the group climbed toward stardom, the story didn't get simpler -- it got weirder. James' behavior became increasingly bizarre, culminating on the group's harrowing 1994 album The Holy Bible. Early in 1995, James disappeared, leaving no trace of his whereabouts. The remaining trio carried on with 1996's Everything Must Go, the album that established them as superstars in England, yet that came at the expense of the arrogant, renegade gender-bending and revolutionary rhetoric that had earned them their initial fan base. It was a bizarre, unpredictable journey for a group that once proclaimed that all bands should break up after releasing one album.

James Dean Bradfield (vocals, guitar), Nicky Wire (born Nick Jones; bass), Sean Moore (drums), and Flicker (rhythm guitar) formed Betty Blue in 1986. Within two years' time, Flicker had left the band and the group had changed its name to the Manic Street Preachers. In the summer of 1988, a fellow student at Swansea University, Richey James (born Richey Edwards), who had previously been the group's driver, joined the band as rhythm guitarist. They began recording demos, eventually releasing the single "Suicide Alley" in August. "Suicide Alley" boasted a cover replicating that of the Clash's first album, which indicated the sound of the group at the time -- equal parts punk and hard rock. A year after the single's release, NME gave it an enthusiastic review, citing James' press release -- "We are as far away from anything in the '80s as possible."

Indeed, the Manics were one of the key bands of the early '90s, and their career didn't get rolling until 1991. The New Art Riot EP appeared in the summer of 1990, followed by a pair of defining singles -- "Motown Junk" and "You Love Us" -- in early 1991 on Heavenly Records. The singles and the Manics' incendiary live shows, where they wrote slogans on their shirts, created a strong buzz in the music press, which only escalated that May. James gave an interview with Steve Lamacq for NME in which Lamacq questioned the group's authenticity; after an argument, James responded by carving the words "4 Real" on his arm. The incident became a sensation, attracting numerous magazine articles, as well as a major-label contract with Sony. Many observers interpreted the action as a simple stunt, but over the next few years it became clear that the self-mutilation was the first indication of James' mental instability.

"Stay Beautiful" was the Manics' first release for Sony, and it climbed into the British Top 40 late in the summer of 1991, followed early in 1992 by a re-recorded "You Love Us," which peaked in the Top 20. By the time they released their much-hyped debut album, Generation Terrorists, in February 1992 -- a record the band claimed would outsell Guns N' Roses' Appetite for Destruction -- they had already cultivated a large and devoted following, many of whom emulated their glammy appearance and read the same novels and philosophers the group name-dropped. The Manics had been claiming that they would disband following the release of their debut, yet it became clear by the fall, when a non-LP cover of "Suicide Is Painless (Theme from M*A*S*H)" became their first Top Ten hit, that they would continue performing. Nicky Wire and Richey James had become notorious for their banter throughout the British music press, and while it earned them countless articles, it also painted the group into a corner. Comparatively polished and mainstream compared to its predecessor, Gold Against the Soul, the group's second album, appeared in the summer of 1993 to mixed reviews.

Shortly after the release of Gold Against the Soul, the Manics' support began to slide as the group began to splinter amidst internal tensions, many of them stemming from James. Nicky Wire ran into trouble over on-stage remarks about R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe dying of AIDS, but Richey James was in genuine trouble. Suffering from deepening alcoholism and anorexia, James entered prolonged bouts of depression, highlighted by incidents of self-mutilation -- most notoriously at a concert in Thailand, when he appeared with his chest slashed open by knives a fan gave him. Early in 1994, he entered a private clinic, and the band had to perform a number of concerts as a trio. James' mental illness surfaced on the group's third album, The Holy Bible. Reportedly recorded in a red-light district in Wales, The Holy Bible was a bleak, disillusioned record that earned considerable critical acclaim upon its late-summer release in 1994.

Although the Manics' critical reputation was restored and James was playing with the band, even giving numerous interviews with the press, all was not well. Prior to the American release of The Holy Bible and the band's ensuing tour, James checked out of his London hotel on February 1, 1995, drove to his Cardiff apartment, and disappeared, leaving behind his passport and credit cards. Within the week he was reported missing and his abandoned car was found on the Severen Bridge outside of Bristol, a spot notorious for suicides. By the summer, the police had presumed he was dead. Broken but not beaten, the remaining Manics decided to carry on as a trio, working the remaining lyrics James left behind into songs.

The Manic Street Preachers returned in December 1995 opening for the Stone Roses. In May 1996, they released Everything Must Go, which was preceded by the number two single "A Design for Life." Their most direct and mature record to date, Everything Must Go was greeted with enthusiastic reviews, and the Manics became major stars in England. Throughout 1996, the band toured constantly, and most U.K. music publications named Everything Must Go Album of the Year. Despite their growing success, several older fans expressed distress at the group's increasingly conservative image, yet that didn't prevent the album from going multi-platinum.

Everything Must Go didn't just go multi-platinum -- it established the Manics as superstars throughout the world. Everywhere except America, that is. The album received a belated release in the U.S., appearing in August of 1996, and the group attempted an American tour, opening for Oasis. It should have led to increased exposure, but a blowup between the Gallaghers led to Oasis canceling the entire tour, leaving the Manics at square one. They returned to the U.K. and toured, receiving a number of awards at the end of the year. They didn't deliver their much-anticipated follow-up, This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours, until August of 1998. The album was another blockbuster success in the U.K., Europe, and Asia, but it didn't receive a release in America, since the Manics were in the process of leaving Epic in the U.S.

For a while, there was simply no interest in the Manics by American labels, but another multi-platinum album and numerous awards in Britain revived interest. The band signed with Virgin, which issued This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours in the U.S. during June 1999 -- nearly a year after its initial release. Know Your Enemy followed in 2001, although it was not well-received, and the band moved to Sony for British distribution of 2004's Lifeblood. Both vocalist/guitarist James Dean Bradfield and bassist Nicky Wire followed this release with solo albums, and then reconvened in 2007 to record the edgier, punk-influenced Send Away the Tigers with producer Dave Eringa. After its release, the band quickly set to work on another album, using Richey James' abandoned lyrics as inspiration. "All 13 songs on the new record feature lyrics left to us by Richey," the Manics wrote on their website in early 2009. "The brilliance and intelligence of the lyrics dictated that we had to finally use them." Titled Journal for Plague Lovers, the album was recorded on analog tape by veteran engineer Steve Albini and released that May. Postcards from a Young Man, the band's tenth studio album, followed in 2010.

After releasing a compilation called National Treasures: The Complete Singles in the fall of 2011, the Manics released a super-deluxe 20th Anniversary edition of Generation Terrorists in 2012. Meanwhile, the band plugged away in the studio, working on a ludicrously ambitious project tentatively titled 70 Songs of Hatred and Failure. At one point they despaired of simply having written too much material, before hitting on the idea of releasing two very different albums. The first, a folky, almost entirely acoustic, emotionally raw effort entitled Rewind the Film, appeared in the fall of 2013, and the second, the "spiky" and Krautrock-inspired Futurology, was slated for May 2014.

A documentary on the Manics, entitled Escape from History, arrived in 2017, followed by the full-length Resistance Is Futile in April 2018. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

Happy Mondays

Happy Mondays formed in 1980 in Salford, Greater Manchester. The original line-up - Shaun Ryder on lead vocals, with brother Paul Ryder on bass, lead guitarist Mark Day, keyboardist Paul Davis, and drummer Gary Whelan. Mark ‘Bez’ Berry later joined the band onstage during a live performance after befriending Shaun Ryder and served as a dancer and percussionist. Rowetta then joined the band to provide backing vocals in the early 1990s.

Their first official release was the ’Forty Five EP' on Factory Records in September 1985.  Tony Wilson discovered them and they signed to Factory Records. Their first album ‘Squirrel and G-Man Twenty Four Hour Party People Plastic Face Carnt Smile’ (White Out) released in 1987 and was produced by John Cale. This was followed by two classic albums, ‘Bummed’ in 1988, produced by Martin Hannett.

‘Pills ’n’ Thrills and Bellyaches in 1990 produced by Paul Oakenfold and Steve Osborne which went platinum in the UK selling more than 350,000 copies. This put the band firmly on the map as one of the most influential bands to come out of the UK in the early 1990s. The album was recorded at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles. Singles ’Step On' and ‘Kinky Afro' from this album both reached number 5 in the UK singles chart. ‘Yes Please!’ followed in 1992, produced by Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth, recorded at Eddy Grant’s studio in Barbados. By the late 1980s the Happy Mondays were an important part of the Manchester music scene. Numerous world tours meant the band had international success as well as massive success in their home country.

The line up of the band during this first and most important ten year phase never changed, and the six original members Shaun Ryder, Paul Ryder, Gary Whelan, Paul Davis, Mark Day and Bez remained together until the first incarnation came to an end in 1994. In 1999 Happy Mondays re-formed with founding members Shaun Ryder, Paul Ryder, Gary Whelan and Bez minus Paul Davis and Mark Day. In the place of Day and Davis were Wags and a number of other session musicians including Ben Leach, percussionist Lea Mullen and rapper 'Nuts'. Also joining the new line-up was soul singer Rowetta Satchell who sang on Pills, Thrills, and Bellyaches.  The band toured extensively in the UK and internationally, selling out the 20,000 capacity Manchester Arena and released of a new single, a cover version Thin Lizzy 'The Boys Are Back in Town’. They also provided support for Oasis on their 'Standing on the Shoulder of Giants' arena tour, as well as playing numerous festivals worldwide.  The band again ceased their activity in 2001 following the departure of bass player and founding member Paul Ryder.

2004 saw another re-formation, comprising original members Bez, Whelan and Shaun Ryder along with another group of musicians - bassist Mikey Shine, keyboard player Dave Parkinson and guitarist Jonn Dunn. Dave Parkinson was later replaced by Dan Broad. In 2007 they released their first album in fourteen years ‘Uncle Dysfunktional’ produced by Sunny Levine and Howie B and released on Big Brother Records.  The band played Coachella Music Festival in California and toured throughout the summer of 2007.  In 2009 they toured the USA and Canada with The Psychedelic Furs.  This version of the band continued until 2010.  Members Mikey Shine, Jonn Dunn & Dan Broad continued to back Shaun Ryder for his solo tour until 2011, surrounding the release of his autobiography.

In 2012 the band returned with a definitive line up of Shaun Ryder, Paul Ryder, Mark Day, Gary Whelan, Rowetta and Paul Davis and played a thirteen date UK touring a number of European Festivals and a best of album ‘Double Double Good’ was released along with a live recording of the band’s May 2012 gig in Brixton.  Followed in 2013 with more international dates and a UK tour celebrating their second album ‘Bummed’.

In the summer of 2015 the band played several UK festivals as well as shows in Japan, Hong Kong and China. In September the Watch Channel broadcast ’Singing in the Rainforest’ a programme which followed the band as they travelled to Panama to compose, record and perform a brand new song ‘Oo La La to Panama’ with an isolated tribe called the Embera.  

This was followed by a UK tour in November to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the release of their album ‘Pills ’n’ Thrills and Bellyaches’.  

After a successful UK tour in November/December 2017 Happy Mondays are playing festivals throughout 2018. The current line up is:  Shaun Ryder - vocals, Mark Day - guitar, Paul Ryder - bass, Gary Whelan - drums, Rowetta - vocals and Dan Broad - keyboardist and musical director.

 

Circa Waves

Indie rock band Circa Waves was formed in Liverpool in May 2013 by guitarist and singer Keiran Shuddall, who had decided to "knuckle down" and commit fully to music after spending years in a succession of no-hope garage bands. After writing a batch of songs and putting some demos online, he recruited second guitarist Joe Falconer, bassist Sam Rourke, and drummer Sian Plummer, and the band undertook a few short tours of the U.K. and Europe. Their melodic, propulsive rock sound, heavily inspired by the Strokes and also often compared to the Vaccines, was well-received by audiences, and such a buzz built around them that they were soon offered a deal with Transgressive Records, erstwhile home of Foals, the Subways, and Mystery Jets.

Peter Hook & The Light

 

Clean Cut Kid

Having toured relentlessly for three years, alongside recording their debut album with numerous producers and in numerous studios, Clean Cut Kid decided to take a 10 month break from touring to record new music. On Wednesday 12th September, the band will mark their return with new single ‘Emily,’ taken from their upcoming ‘Painkiller’ EP out 22nd October.

The first thing the band did was head back to their native Liverpool, where they rented a pod in an old shipping factory in the Baltic Triangle area of the city, and filled it with vintage recording equipment. Once that was fully set up, they locked themselves away for months on end, getting everything up to the standard they wanted.

Mike Halls (lead singer/guitarist) was adamant that these new songs would be more personal to Clean Cut Kid, both in the themes they cover, but also to the band as a whole. Explaining this, Mike says: “I want to write about things in my life, what we’re feeling, whether they be sad or joyous. The ultimate thing is to take the deepest emotions and work it in to a message that isn’t miserable.”

Written, recorded and engineered entirely by the band, ‘Emily’ finds Clean Cut Kid deviating from their indie-pop sound of first album Felt – released last year – in to a more lo-fi, American East Coast sound, complete with 70s-inspired, fuzz guitar lines, harmonic backing vocals, a stand-alone verse from Evelyn Halls (keys) and thudding drums, with echoes of Fleetwood Mac, The Rolling Stones and Phoebe Bridgers.

Anteros

Anteros are a London indie pop four-piece fronted by Laura Hayden, drawing influence from the likes of Blondie, old school No Doubt, The Cure, The Cardigans and Blur.

The band came together when singer and main lyricist Laura Hayden moved to London from Barcelona and started writing songs with Josh. “I always wanted to do music but I never had the balls or the knowledge,” she explains. “And when I wanted to start writing, Josh had, er, "good credentials".” Those credentials included being in a band with an ex of Laura’s but the chemistry was good and the two soon built up a body of songs, before recruiting Harry and, later, Jackson to the cause. In desperate need of a name to put their songs to online, they picked Anteros - the god of requited love, a landmark in London that united the scattered members in one place and, most importantly, the title of the song that cemented their retro-tinged indie pop sound.

The Seamonsters

The Seamonsters are an indie glitter band from Sheffield, driven by 80s inspired synths and angelic vocals. Comprising of Naomi Mann, Holly Thompson, Tassie Drobinski, Lauren Smith, Ella Taylor and Ciara Hurding; the six 18 and 19 year olds are influenced by Pulp, Altered Images and Orange Juice along with more recent indie artists like Black Honey and The Wombats, creating catchy songs for dreamy dance floors.
Their debut single 'Lost (and Found)' created a social media buzz around the band and formed an interest in what was to come. Following this The Seamonsters sound was described by platforms such as the popular music blog Punktastic as “undeniably charming indie music” and by We the Germs blog as having “emotion packed fantastic guitar lines and an all-round summery feeling”.

Bedroom High Club

Bedroom High Club are a self proclaimed ‘new age indie’ band. Nice music for nice people.

Children of the State

Children of the State are aurally positioned between corrupt 70s glam and wistful electronic rock, with a wealth of ear-worms to make even the most miserable nihilist grin into their soy cappuccino. 

On record, Children of the State’s sound is shiny and raw with nods to The Beach Boys ‘Pet Sounds’ and Joe Meek’s ‘I Hear a New World - An Outer Space Music Fantasy’ with no musical stone being left unturned thanks to long-term collaborator and producer, Nathan Saoudi of the Fat White Family.

Their live shows have been described as ‘ritualistic’ and ‘just downright bizarre’ by budding journalists across the UK, with a recent headline show at The Old Blue Last ending in tears of blissful rapture.

Courteeners

Hailing from Manchester, England, indie rock quartet the Courteeners received regular comparisons in the U.K. press to the leading lights of three previous waves of Mancunian Brit-pop: the Smiths, the Stone Roses, and Oasis. The band's alternately jangly and bombastic brand of indie guitar rock bears the influence of all three acts, as well as comparisons to contemporaries like Arctic Monkeys and Kasabian. Featuring vocalist Liam Fray, lead guitarist Daniel Conan Moores, bassist Mark Cupello, and drummer Michael Campbell, the Courteeners formed in Manchester in 2006, when the 22-year-old Fray -- already known around town for his acoustic singer/songwriter gigs -- brought three of his childhood friends together to form a proper band.

Rag'n'Bone Man

Rag ‘N’ Bone Man has been a prolific underground name for a couple of years now, honing a ferocious live reputation through guitar wielding solo performances, as the resident vocalist of rap's Rum Committee, and now through his first release through independent label ‘Best Laid Plans’: Wolves. And, like many things, it began with the blues. 

Having discovered the genre as a child, the rhythmic troubles that rang out from his parents' record player planted a stubborn seed in this kid's head and it wasn't long before the youngster was venturing through classic realms of soul, jazz and folk.

Rag ‘N’ Bone Man (or Rory)’s first dice with performing real live music was to be rooted in those earlier fascinations. Twenty five years younger than most of the clientele, Graham used to hit up a local jam session, and one particular evening, after a couple of pints, he'd end up making a decision that would define his future. After one too many, he got the courage to jump on stage and sing a Robert Johnson song; shocked that people actually liked it. He went a few more times, then every week – playing harmonica or singing on stage. At this point, he knew it was what he wanted to do. 

A move to Brighton and a slice of fate introduced him to two influential figures. Firstly, the rapper Gi3mo, who immediately shipped Graham's vocal talents into his hip hop crew, Rum Committee. Next came a meeting with the prolific beatmaker Leaf Dog, resulting in an intense meeting of minds; their six track Dog n' Bone EP.

In his good friend and producer Mark Crew, he found a kindred spirit and the two began working towards a 'project'. After eight months, they found themselves staring down the pop, soul and hip-hop cannonade of nine blistering tracks, which Graham has named ‘Wolves’.

Owing to that moment when his blues and beats worlds collided, the sound of Rag N' Bone perfects an artistic dualism of old and new. The nine tracks of ‘Wolves’ pack an eruptive mixture of hip hop and electronic thunder, with a golden coating of soul. He may have honed his trade underground, but this release marks the Rag ‘N’ Bone Man stepping out of the shadows.

Reverend and The Makers

Fusing indie rock melody and attitude with dance rhythm, Reverend & the Makers were formed by vocalist and songwriter Jon McClure, who at the age of 25 was already a fixture on the music scene in Sheffield, England. Previously a member of the short-lived bands Judan Suki and 1984, McClure had a reputation in Sheffield as both a songwriter and a poet, and was something of a mentor to Alex Turner, who would become an overnight sensation as the leader of the group Arctic Monkeys (Turner mentions McClure's 1984 in his song "I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor").

Lewis Capaldi

 

When Lewis Capaldi’s debut single Bruises exploded at the start of 2017 it seemed from an outside perspective to have all the hallmarks of an overnight sensation. How could this 20-year-old with a soul-wrenching voice that sounded like it had been hewn from granite seemingly emerge from nowhere with a song of such emotional depth?

A stripped-back and almost painfully raw meditation on love and loss from a writer who seemed like he’d already lived several lives and had the scars to prove it, within weeks it had racked up an astonishing 15 million Spotify plays and topped streaming charts around the world.

“Once we got to 10 million, I was like, ‘Right, I’m going to stop looking at this because I’m happy with that,’” laughs Capaldi, sat in a Soho coffee shop in a rare bit of down time. “People ask me, ‘How do you feel about everything?’ I’m confused, I’m like, ‘How the hell has this happened?’ I was happy to release something and then to just see it explode. People are telling me that they’ve heard it in shops in Thailand, they’ve been in Zante and Magaluf and Ibiza and they’ve heard remixes of it in clubs. It’s absolutely mental. I’m kind of always thinking that someone’s going to turn around and tell me, ‘Oh lad, we’re only joking!’”

Have a listen to any of the other tunes Capaldi has been stockpiling into a goldmine of songs and it seem very, very unlikely that anyone will be saying that. Capaldi is that rare thing: a writer who can take his own experiences and pain and craft them into deeply effecting, heart-bruised truths that resonate with anyone who hears them.

If Capaldi seems to have a maturity as an artist and a performer that goes beyond his years then that might be down to the fact that he’s had a bit of a head start. In fact, given the years of graft the West Lothian native has put in, he’d probably take umbrage at the notion that it was an “overnight” success.

“I picked the guitar up at nine, started writing songs at eleven and then was gigging from 12 onwards,” he states matter-of-factly, before delivering a bit of customary self-deprecation. “I mean, they were awful songs, but it was fun. I was always trying to get in places, playing at pubs. I’d show up and try and blag my way in. I’d have to hide in the toilets and then jump out and do my set as quickly as possible before anyone knew there was a 12-year-old in the pub.”

From then on in Capaldi devoted every spare moment he had to writing and performing. Playing gigs in Glasgow, Edinburgh and anywhere he could find a receptive audience, he was constantly working on songs, finding his voice as a songwriter and honing his craft with unwavering dedication. All the while developing the rough-around-the-edges vocals that would make those songs soar.

“I’m constantly writing. Even now, if I’m not doing a gig or in rehearsals, I’m writing. It’s constant because you’re only as good as your next song,” he says, perhaps forgetting for a moment that he’s got one of the most acclaimed debut releases this year already under his belt. “A lot of my pals laugh because they’re roofers and electricians and they’ve got real jobs, and I’ll go, ‘Oh man, I’m so stressed out trying to write songs,” They’re like, “Shut the hell up.” I get it, but it’s a slog, man. It can be proper difficult at times.”

It’s a slog that has paid off in spades. With “hundreds of songs” crafted in the last year alone, Lewis Capaldi is already shaping up to be one of the British Isles’ most gifted songwriters. Preposterously, when it comes to the daunting process of picking a dozen for a debut album in the future, he feels that Bruises might not even make the cut.

“An album has to sound cohesive. So if Bruises still to me feels like it should be on the album at that point, then I don’t see why not,” he ponders. “I’m constantly writing, but then it’s the hope that every song will be better than the last one. It’s just constantly trying to better yourself.”

Not a bad position to find yourself in, but if he feels the success of his first offering might be fading he’s sorely mistaken.

“Yesterday I phoned up the bank and the girl was like, “I’ll phone you back in ten minutes…” She phoned back in ten minutes and said, “Oh, I recognised your name, I really like your song”.’ He recalls with disbelief. “Things like that are just like ‘… Oh shit, that’s weird.’”

Much as he might currently find it strange, Capaldi’s success is only going to grow from here. He’d better get used to it.

The Rifles

Sports Team

Hailing from various parts of the UK, six-piece Sports Team met while studying at Cambridge. They’re now based in Harlesden (west London), tucked “between the McVities biscuit factory and an evangelical church.”

Casey Lowry

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As a child growing up in Derbyshire, Casey Lowry didn’t so much tinker about with music as throw himself into it headfirst. That level of commitment has informed his approach ever since. Singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, Casey knew right from the off that it was music or nothing. 

At the age of 14, Casey wrote his first song, Trampoline. He tells you this this almost casually - about a song that, on its release last year, was playlisted at Radio 1, reached No 2 on Spotify’s UK Viral 50 chart and has racked up more than 500,000 streams. When he wrote the song, Casey was in a covers band in his hometown of Chesterfield. Some instinct in him, he says, made him keep Trampoline for himself. Not that it would have suited the band, he thinks - which was chugging along, playing in local pubs. “Every musician needs to go through that experience, it teaches you so much, both good and bad. We played Mr Brightside, Wonderwall, Pompeii - all the classics. And we were absolutely terrible.”

Easy Life

Children of the State

Children of the State are aurally positioned between corrupt 70s glam and wistful electronic rock, with a wealth of ear-worms to make even the most miserable nihilist grin into their soy cappuccino. 

On record, Children of the State’s sound is shiny and raw with nods to The Beach Boys ‘Pet Sounds’ and Joe Meek’s ‘I Hear a New World - An Outer Space Music Fantasy’ with no musical stone being left unturned thanks to long-term collaborator and producer, Nathan Saoudi of the Fat White Family.

Their live shows have been described as ‘ritualistic’ and ‘just downright bizarre’ by budding journalists across the UK, with a recent headline show at The Old Blue Last ending in tears of blissful rapture.

Everly Pregnant Brothers

The Everly Pregnant Brothers are 10 years old!
2019 marks the tenth year since their formation back in 2009 when Pete and Bails thought it would
be a good idea to buy a couple of ukes and play a few songs at a party. Neither of them could have
envisaged what a phenomenon the Everly Pregnant Brothers would turn out to be.
The band regularly plays to sell out audiences across the country and have a reputation based on
their high energy live performances that captivate and elate their fans.

Chic Feat. Nile Rodgers

There is no doubt that Chic was disco's greatest band. Working in a heavily producer-dominated field, they were most definitely a band. By the time Chic appeared in the late '70s, disco was already heading toward mainstream saturation and an inevitable downfall. Chic bucked the trend by stripping disco's sound down to its basic elements. Specializing in stylish grooves with a uniquely organic sense of interplay, Chic's sound was anchored by the scratchy "chucking"-style rhythm guitar of Nile Rodgers, the indelible, widely imitated, and sometimes outright stolen basslines of Bernard Edwards, and the powerhouse drumming of Tony Thompson. As producers, Rodgers and Edwards used keyboard and string embellishments economically, which kept the emphasis on rhythm. Chic's distinctive approach not only resulted in some of the era's finest singles, including the number one hits "Le Freak" and "Good Times" -- only two of several classics off the platinum albums C'est Chic (1978) and Risqué (1979) -- but also helped create a template for funk, dance-pop, and hip-hop in the post-disco era. Not coincidentally, Rodgers and Edwards wound up as two of the most successful pop producers, and the sound they developed and perfected remained relevant for decades, acknowledged most notably with the duo's induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Through the 2010s, Rodgers continued to lead Chic as a major live draw and took the act back to the studio for It's About Time (2018).

 

 

Doves

Before embracing Brit-pop in the late '90s, Doves' three members -- vocalist/bassist Jimi Goodwin, guitarist Jez Williams, and drummer Andy Williams -- figured prominently in the Madchester scene, where they scored a Top Five single as part of the dance combo Sub Sub. "Ain't No Love (Ain't No Use)" peaked at number three in the U.K., but Sub Sub failed to produce any significant follow-up hits, and a fire destroyed their recording studio in February 1995. After taking several years to restructure their sound, the musicians reappeared in 1998 as Doves, whose sweeping pop/rock material owed more to the Verve and Radiohead than Sub Sub's club-oriented peers.

Doves debuted in October 1998 with the Cedar EP, which sold out of its limited pressing and paved the way for the musicians' association with Badly Drawn Boy (who employed them as his backing band on several singles). Doves released two additional EPs, Sea and Here It Comes, before signing a European contract with Heavenly Records, the venerable London-based label that had recently scored a hit with Beth Orton. Heavenly issued Doves' full-length debut, Lost Souls, in April 2000, while an American release followed in October via the Astralwerks label. Marrying traces of Sub Sub's danceable past with an emphasis on live pop/rock instrumentation, Lost Souls earned a nomination for the Mercury Prize -- which the band ironically lost to Badly Drawn Boy -- and spawned three Top 40 singles in the U.K. By 2001, the band's American representation had been upgraded to Capitol Records, and Doves returned to the U.K. charts one year later with The Last Broadcast. The sophomore album debuted atop the charts in England and, like its predecessor, climbed to platinum status, propelled in part by the number three single "There Goes the Fear."

While assembling their third album, Some Cities, Doves retreated to the English countryside and took up residence in a number of cottages, churches, and intimate recording studios. Although conceived far away from the band's native Manchester, Some Cities still sported an urban tone, and the album climbed to number one during its first week of release. Doves' audience was further expanded through a number of touring efforts, some of which saw the band opening for the likes of U2, Oasis, and Coldplay. Several years later, Doves once again decamped to more rural surroundings -- this time to the agricultural community of Cheshire, England, where they set up shop in a converted farmhouse -- to record another album. Kingdom of Rust was ultimately released in April 2009, followed by a greatest hits album one year later. ~ Andrew Leahey, Rovi

Miles Kane

Dubbed ‘one of Britain’s Landmark Composers’ by MOJO, Liverpool born and bred Miles Kane first found his love of music at age 17 as a member of the band The Little Flames, the dissolution of which led to the formation of The Rascals in 2007. With The Rascals also began the relationship between Miles Kane and Alex Turner when the band supported the Sheffield four piece, Arctic Monkeys in the same year. 2008 saw Miles playing and touring with Turner as The Last Shadow Puppets in support of their No. 1, Mercury Nominated album entitled ‘The Age of The Understatement’.

As demonstrated by both his music and personal style, Kane has never been one to shy away from a statement and he went on to debut his solo material ‘Colour of the Trap’ in May 2011 to critical acclaim, selling out headline UK and Europeans shows and winning over crowds at major UK and international festivals.

Miles returned to the scene with his sophomore album ‘Don’t Forget Who You Are’, with no less enthusiasm for the avant-garde whilst retaining his signature style. A combination of both albums has resulted in plaudits & nominations across the board including awards from Q, Mojo, NME, and a much coveted Mercury nomination.

Seven years on from ‘Colour Of The Trap’, Kane’s hotly anticipated third solo album is set for release in Spring 2018.

Shame

Dead Oceans is happy to announce the debut album from Britain’s most hotly tipped band Shame. Songs of Praise is  out 12th January, 2018 and the video for new single ‘One Rizla’ is available to watch now:

Shot on a farm in Lancashire, the video sees the young band’s first, moderately successful and entertaining foray into farm-work, with a less than amused patriarch overseeing their work. It’s directly related to the album artwork for Songs of Praise with singer Charlie Steen stating ’We wanted to turn the album artwork into the video for One Rizla, highlighting our vulnerability as individuals whilst paying homage to Withnail & I simultaneously.”

Sleeper

Sleeper enjoyed huge critical and commercial success in the mid 90s: achieving 8 Top 40 singles across 3 Top 10 albums with well over 1,000,000 sales.  Their music was characterized by astute, observational lyrics and big, hook driven melodies. Wener was an iconic front-person, heading up a movement that brought women center stage in guitar music.

BLOXX

4 piece alternative band from London.

 

Oddity Road

Supported by Huw Stephens on Radio 1 and given a spin by Steve Lamacq on BBC Radio 6, Oddity Road defy their young age to deliver heavy riffs and tight infectious songs influenced by bands such as Kings Of Leon, Foo Fighters and The Killers.

These hard working young lads from Sheffield have gigged relentlessly up and down the U.K. and supported numerous bands, including mates The Sherlocks.

With wider critical acclaim further cementing their assured confidence this unsigned band are destined for bigger things.

‘For fans of the big indie chorus’ - championed by Dean Jackson BBC Introducing and Huw Stephens on Radio 1

Big in 2018 nomination - Fred Perry Subculture

‘An Instant classic’ (All Again) - Gordon Smart / John Kennedy Radio X

Cora Pearl

One of the finest bands to emerge on the Sheffield scene in recent times, Cora Pearl bring a fast-paced and energetic live show with elements of heavy indie-rock, psych and grunge.

The Reytons

 

Sea Girls

Picture the scene. Thousands upon thousands of fans gathered in one space with hands aloft, screaming
along to every word and their body shaking with adrenaline as track after track hits them like a tidal wave.
That feeling, of being wrapped up in a band who seize the euphoric and turn it into something vital and real
in front of your eyes, that feeling is what makes a band special. Emblazoned front and centre, it’s what Sea
Girls burst and pulse with - a band aiming first and foremost at being the torch-bearing sing-a-long for a
whole new generation and a band trading, at its core, in what may seem the simplest of sciences. Turn
everything up a notch, write anthems to throw yourselves into and be that soundtrack for the best nights of
people’s lives.